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UAFA

What’s Left of Queer?: Immigration, Sexuality, and Affect in a Neoliberal World

 

May 12, 2010

We need to refuse the narratives of abjection that are routinely forced upon us. They only render us immobile creatures, begging for help. We are all neoliberals now. We’re all selling our bodies, our lives, our stories to the media and to provide comfort to ourselves. Those stories have to be challenged and reworked or we lose sight of the larger story of economic exploitation, at our peril.

Gay Immigration (and) Inequality [6 June, 2006]

What does immigration mean for queers?  A heterosexual U.S.  citizen/permanent resident (c/pr) can sponsor a spouse for immigration; a queer U.S. c/pr can’t sponsor a partner.  The Uniting American Families Act (UAFA) seeks to reverse this by substituting the phrase ‘permanent partner’ wherever the word ‘spouse’ appears in the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Queer Immigration: Change the Paradigms [9 January, 2008]

The Uniting American Families Act (UAFA) is back in the news.  Currently, heterosexual married citizens and permanent residents can sponsor their non-citizen spouses for immigration.  The UAFA extends that privilege to same-sex binational couples, substituting the words ‘permanent partner’ for ‘spouse’ in the language of immigration law.  Stories about binational couples emphasize that their relationships aren’t considered as equal to those of married people.

Queers and Immigration Reform: Where Do We Stand? [10 January, 2008]

On January 8, The Washington Times reported that Mike Huckabee supported amending the constitution so that children born in the US to “illegal aliens” could not automatically become American citizens.  On January 9, the same paper reported Huckabee’s denial that he supported any such measure. 

Who Needs Larry Kramer?: A resurrected ACT UP does not a progressive queer agenda make [June 2007]

By the time you read this, a vastly over-inflated moment of queer hype will have sputtered and gasped to its inevitable end.  The events following Larry Kramer's March speech now constitute a tempest in a teacup.  But they did draw out some strong emotions, not all of them articulated in the kind of grandstanding we witnessed in the photographs of self-proclaimed AIDS activists in ACT UP t-shirts.

Gay marriage and queer immigration: Laboring over love [28 May, 2008]

The recent California decision on gay marriage fills me with dread—dread at the schlock I know is awaiting me during this Pride month and afterwards; dread about hearing all the triumphant rhetoric about “equality;” and dread that queers are going to speak about marriage as some kind of dream fulfilled.  Again.

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